Maya's poster she made last year for Earth Year


As well as making a stand against climate change and global warming by turning off our lights tonight at 8.30, we can watch the live camera feeds at EarthTV.com from Paris (Eiffel Tower), Sydney (Opera House and Harbour Bridge), Berlin (Brandenburg Gate), and Munich (Church of our Lady). These landmarks will turn off their lights to support Earth Hour and as a symbol of hope for a cause that grows more urgent by the hour.

In addition to these live feeds, you can tune in this weekend for delayed transmissions from Dubai (Burj Kahlifa and Burjf Al Arab), Hong Kong, Amsterdam, New York (Empire State Building), Auckland (Sky Tower), and Melbourne (Arts Centre and Crown Casino).


With almost 5 million supporters and a global network in over 100 countries, Earth Hour-organized by WWF-is one of the world's largest and most respected independent conservation organizations. WWF’s mission is to stop the degradation of the Earth's natural environment and build a future where people live in harmony with nature.

Earth Hour started in 2007 in Sydney, Australia when 2.2 million homes and businesses turned their lights off for one hour to make their stand against climate change. Only a year later and Earth Hour had become a global sustainability movement with more than 50 million people across 35 countries participating. In 2009, 4,000 cities in 88 countries switched off their lights for "Earth Hour" in order to call attention to the climate change.

Even though turning off our lights for an hour may be a token gesture towards a greener planet, it is still important in bringing awareness and thought to the situation, especially for the children. It is a tangible act that they can relate to and keeps the issue high on their agenda.





1 comments

Christopher Jennings said... @ March 29, 2010 at 6:22 AM

Earth hour is truly a memorable event! In our city of Chicago, the community became one at a instant when all lights went off almost simultaneously and remained at such for one whole hour. It was the first time that I experienced seeing our very beautiful skyline in total darkness. For one moment there, I learned to appreciate the other side of Chicago, when everything was not as busy as a normal night would be.

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